Our Policy Work

 
 
NATO SP.jpg

NATO STABILITY POLICING CENTRE OF EXCELLENCE

  • Dates: 2017 – Present

  • Core proficiencies: Stability policing monitoring and evaluation; Preventative and counter violent extremism.

PROJECT DETAILS

Our CEO provides subject matter expertise, as a civilian advisor, to the NATO Stability Policing Centre of Excellence (SP CoE) for concept development.

The aim of SP is to establish a safe and secure environment (SASE), restore public order and security, and contribute to creating the conditions for effective governance. Throughout the spectrum of conflict, the initial goal of SP is to re-establish and maintain sufficient security for the local populace; afterwards, to re-establish law and order and to enforce the law; and, eventually, to reinforce the local security institutions. (Source: NATO SP page)

  • Situation: NATO SP CoE is developing future models, policies, and standards for stability policing deployments and operations globally.

  • Task: To support NATO SP CoE by participating in concept development sessions.

  • Action: Proved subject matter expertise for SP concept developments and efficacy analysis.

  • Result: Insights and recommendations included in concept package presented to NATO command (Rome, Nov 2017); testing initiated 2018; follow-on advisory to be conducted during 2019.

 
unodc.gif

WORKING GROUP ON CHILDREN RECRUITMENT BY Terrorists and VIOLENT EXTREMIST GROUPS (CRTG)

  • Dates: 2019 – Present

  • Core proficiency: Preventative and counter violent extremism

PROJECT DETAILS

We are supporting the Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice (CPCJ) Alliance, Germany, working group on Children Recruited or Exploited by Terrorist and Violent Extremist Groups.

The working group is established under the CPCJ Alliance, which aims to prioritize, strengthen and support workings of the UNODC working group of the same name, and which is recognized by the UNODC. Our CEO serves as co-chair of the CRTG working group.

  • The aims of the CRTG working group are:

  • To identify principles and strategies for UN agencies and UN member states to address crime, terrorism, and child recruitment/exploitation, and to support the creation of preventative measures in this context;

  • To build capacity for UN agencies and UN member states to promote accountability, justice and rule of law as it applies to child recruitment and exploitation in the context of terrorism and violent extremism;

  • To enhance existing efforts being conducted by civil society, UN agencies and UN member states to more effectively address the challenges associated to child recruitment and exploitation by terrorists and violent extremist groups.

Situation: The challenges associated with children being manipulated and recruited by terrorists and VE groups have been increasing across the globe. The UN, at multiple levels, has recognized this growth and through the UNODC is focused towards these challenges.

Task: To conduct research, analysis, development, and advocacy, in order to assist the UNODC and their primary working group.

Action: Conducting bi-monthly teleconferences* to coordinate and continue analysis and research development; information and source data collection; advocacy. *Facilitated through our LTDI program

 

POLICY PAPER 1: ‘RETURN AND REBUILD’

ENABLING IDPs AND REFUGEES TO RETURN TO REBUILD THEIR COMMUNITIES

The 1st NAEF provided policy recommendations – accepted and implemented by the Canadian government – for humanitarian aid in Kurdistan, Iraq and other post-conflict zones, including ‘Return and Rebuild’.

SUMMARY OF ‘RETURN AND REBUILD’

  • Date: 2016

  • Core proficiency: Post-conflict recovery

The 1st NAEF proposed a forward-thinking ‘Return and Rebuild’ model to the Canadian government, for refugee aid and stability development, ultimately aimed at enabling internally displaced persons (IDPs) and refugees to return to and rebuild their communities (once they have been made secure and stable).

Situation: The humanitarian crisis caused by the rise of ISIS and other global conflicts led to the systemic crippling of global response operations, capacity, and capability. IDPs and refugees were suffering in camps and along migration pathways, waiting to be rehoused away from their affected communities rather than being encouraged to return and rebuild.

  • The local conditions in crisis zones – lack of water, sanitation, infrastructure, safety, etc – meant that refugees could not return to their former homelands.

  • The international response model was also based on member countries taking in and rehousing refugees rather than helping them return to a safe and secure environment in their communities.

  • Insight from global leaders was required to develop policies, reduce redundancy, and implement best practices solutions to the challenges present relating to migrants and internally displaced persons.

Task: To create an awareness and influence program to replace outdated perceptions and solutions models – shift from taking in and assimilating refugees, to sheltering them, and then enabling them to return to and rebuild their communities (once safety and security had been established).

Action: We put a forward a forward-thinking model for refugee aid and stability development, focused on solving local problems that had created the diaspora, in order to:

  • Change the existing humanitarian aid paradigm, which was focused on taking in and assimilating refugees;

  • Influencing refugee support systems to help refugees return to and rebuild their communities.

Result:

  • Return and Rebuild framework included in the Canadian government’s formation of the Yazidi Action Coalition.

  • Influenced policy and thought leaders - Including Nadia Murad, Nobel Peace Prize Recipient – high profile discussions have been taking place on our recommended paradigm shift.

 
Yezidi Girl

POLICY PAPER 2: ‘CANADA CARES’

ASSESSING AID REQUIREMENTS IN IRAQ

The 1st NAEF provided policy recommendations – accepted and implemented by the Canadian government – for humanitarian aid in Kurdistan, Iraq and other post-conflict zones, including ‘Canada Cares’.

SUMMARY OF ‘CANADA CARES’

  • Date: 2016

  • Core proficiency: Post-conflict recovery

This recommendations document assessed aid requirements in Iraq for the Canadian government.

Situation: There were gaps in humanitarian aid and response for ISIS-affected regions in Iraq. The Canadian government had not recognized the severity of the situation, or committed sufficient funds or attention to the ongoing crisis.

Task: To assess the gaps in aid response and provide recommendations to representatives of the government in Canada.

Action: Conducted and delivered a comprehensive assessment of, and recommendations for, aid requirements in Iraq.

Result: Key recommendations from the 1st NAEF influenced the Canadian government to:

  1. Form and launch the Yazidi Action Coalition – to advocate for relief, aid, resettlement, and justice for the Yazidi people.

  2. Formally recognize the ISIS genocide against the Yazidis, in the House of Commons

  3. Initially pledge humanitarian aid totaling CAD 320m (US$240m) for Iraq; now standing at CAD 840m (US$635m) pledged.

  4. Prioritize Yezidi refugees and female victims of sexual violence in conflict by ISIS.